Apple & Music

1000 songs in your pocket. That was the promise Steve Jobs delivered with the original iPod. Apple focused on quantity because when it was announce in 2001 we wanted all of our music, nicely ripped into mp3 format, with us wherever we went. Other mp3 players used flash storage; the original iPod used a small hard disk called Microdrive by IBM that enabled every music lover to take all their music with them wherever they went.

Of course the iPod had a headphone jack, because people who love listening to music know you get higher quality with an actual connection.

Fast foward to 2016. The iPod is no more. The iPhone subsumed the iPod, all versions of it, except the iPod touch. And Apple has decided the headphone jack needs to go in the then new iPhone 7 and iPhone 7 Plus. For those who have headphones and prefer to have a physical connection to the iPhone, Apple included a dongle. Apple threw in a dongle for all you music lovers.

From a company who catered to people who love music and up-ended the portable music player market we now have an iPhone — that almost completely eliminated the need for an iPod — without a headphone jack. Apple seems to be having problems remembering its heritage and solving problems no one seems to have. Are there any music lovers out there who wanted Apple to get rid of the headphone jack in the iPhone?

Apple seems to be less interested in people who love music and more interested in people who turn on music in the background.

PS: Several months ago Tim Cook did a video interview on Bloomberg and claimed that Apple deeply cares about music. He was talking about the HomePod as something that will bring a great music experience in the home. In light of the decision Apple has made to get rid of the headphone jack on the iPhones I find it a little paradoxical to hear Tim Cook say that Apple cares deeply about music. Compared to other smart portable speakers the HomePod likely will have better audio quality, but is that saying much?

DxOMark

Marques Brownlee has a great commentary on smartphone DxOMark ratings (it’s a YouTube video). The MKBHD video explains how these ratings are calculated (it’s kind of a black box), and what you should look for to find the right smartphone for you based on what type of photos you like to take.

The highest DxOMark-rated Pixel 2 might not be the best smartphone for you, depending on what camera feature you think is most important. If you’re into portraits the best smartphone according Brownlee, based on zoom and bokeh sub-ratings on DxOMark, is the Samsung Galaxy Note 8. Definitely check out the video; you’ll learn a lot about DxOMark. I know I did.

Notch

An irregular notch with slimmer bezels. Or a straight line with thicker bezels. I think I’ll go with the straight line.

I like straight.

All of those sensors to make Face ID work need to be put somewhere around that area where the front-facing camera is located. Apple decided to make the transition to a more secure authentication method, from Touch ID to Face ID, hence the notch. Although I don’t think it was necessarily an either-or decision. Apple could have kept Touch ID and added Face ID.

Imagine thinner but straight bezels on top and on the bottom with both the familiar home button (Touch ID) and the new Face ID. I’d think with the two combined it would be an exponentially more secure authentication method.

But that would have gotten in the way of the slimmer bezel design. I have issues with really slim bezels (read: iPhone 7s) but Apple, along with Samsung, LG, and a bunch of other smartphone brands, seem to think we all want slimmer bezels. Don’t get me wrong: I don’t like thick bezels (read: Sony Xperia XZ Premium). But I don’t want super-thin bezels either, especially on top and on the bottom. What I want are thick-enough bezels to securely and comfortably hold my phone. I think LG and Samsung did the right thing: slightly thicker bezels for the forehead and the chin.

The screens on the V30, the S8, and Note 8 are nice and straight, too. No weird-looking notch. And just because many of us might some day get used to a weird-looking notch doesn’t make the notch not weird looking.

The iPhone 8 and 8 Plus look good, but man, no headphone jack though.

Privacy, Security, and Apple

[ TechCrunch / Matthew Panzarino ] Apple is the only company I trust to keep my privacy and security as high a priority as building a great product. That’s because to Apple it’s the same thing. At least that’s how I think about Apple. Is Apple perfect? No. I would have preferred a more secure authentication method: an iPhone 7s with Face ID and Touch ID. But there’s no turning back time; Apple has built the iPhone 8 and the iPhone X. So let’s get on with figuring out what we can about Face ID.

Matthew Panzarino asks questions about Face ID and Craig Federighi answers them:

When it comes to customers — users — Apple gathers absolutely nothing itself. Federighi was very explicit on this point.

“We do not gather customer data when you enroll in Face ID, it stays on your device, we do not send it to the cloud for training data,” he notes.

There is an adaptive feature of Face ID that allows it to continue to recognize your changing face as you change hair styles, grow a beard or have plastic surgery. This adaptation is done completely on device by applying re-training and deep learning in the redesigned Secure Enclave. None of that training or re-training is done in Apple’s cloud. And Apple has stated that it will not give access to that data to anyone, for any price.

Apple couldn’t, even if it was forced to by law enforcement. Your Face ID data is never in Apple’s hands. Face ID data is a mathematical model stored in the Secure Enclave. Your face cannot be reverse-engineered even if Apple or anyone else accessed that mathematical model, not that Apple or anyone else can. The only place where your Face ID exists and will continue to exist is the Secure Enclave in your iPhone X. Until you reset your phone, of course.

What if law enforcement whether at the airport, border crossing, or when you’re taking photos demands you turn over your iPhone? Squeeze. Federighi explains all you have to do is press the volume button — either one — and the power button at the same time. This squeeze disables Face ID and forces you to use your passcode to unlock your iPhone X. As far as US law is concerned law enforcement can force you to unlock your iPhone using your fingerprint and most likely your face, but not your passcode.

Face ID will most likely become the de facto authentication standard for all Apple products. I expect to see most of Apple’s product lines that have an embedded display — iMac, MacBook, iPhone, iPad — to shift toward Face ID. (I think it might be a while for Apple Watch to get it though.) I also have a sneaky suspicion the notch design will be tagging along in all future iPhones and iPads. Thankfully MacBooks and iMacs have big enough top bezels to fit all the sensors required to make Face ID work.

iPhone 7s

Here’s what I would have liked.

Apple announces the iPhone 7s and the iPhone 7s Plus. Almost everything looks the same as the iPhone 7 and the iPhone 7 Plus, but almost everything has been improved.

Let’s start with the inside. A11 Bionic chip with Neural Engine, M11 motion coprocessor, better f/1.8 12MP camera, etc. — basically all the new innards of the iPhone 8. But with the new TrueDepth camera from the iPhone X; there’s enough room in the fat forehead for all those sensors.

The entire front glass will be black, to hide the TrueDepth camera. Face ID in conjunction with Touch ID would have made the iPhone 7s the most secure, even more secure than the iPhone X. Put your finger on the Touch ID sensor while looking at your iPhone 7s to unlock. This has to happen simultaneously. Touch ID is something millions of us are used to, so building on what we are familiar with by adding Face ID would have been a much smoother UX transition as well as a more secure one.

The display itself would be the same — 4.7-inch Retina HD display for the non-Plus version and the 5.5-inch display for the Plus version — except that it would not be LCD but OLED: Super Retina HD. The displays would be True Tone and HDR would be fully supported.

The back would have been glass, like the iPhone 8 and X, to enable magnetic charging.

This iPhone 7s would have been great.

Disappearing Bezels on Smartphones

When I hold smartphones with very thin bezels — Samsung’s Galaxy S8 is a good example — I feel uncomfortable. It’s not a physical thing. The curved screen and the body feels smooth, a nice feeling. The discomfort is more psychological.

The feeling that I might make the phone do something I didn’t intend to do. That’s the uncomfortable feeling I get when I’m holding a smartphone with very thin bezels. The only surefire way of holding a smartphone like a S8 is to slightly cup my hand, let the smartphone rest in it, while using my pinky to prevent it from sliding down.

If I try to grip the smartphone using my thumb and pointy finger I don’t get a reassuring experiencing. I don’t get the feeling I have a firm hold. I am not sure this expensive thing won’t slide out of my hand if I try to do some things with it. There is simply not enough non-screen bezel to firmly hold on to. There’s none on top, bottom, left, or right. LG’s V30 might have just enough, but I haven’t had the chance to play it with yet.

The bezels on the iPhone X seem a little thicker on the sides (in the portrait orientation) than the S8, but I don’t think there’s enough bezel for me to hold with my pointy finger and thumb; I’m fairly sure I’ll have a similar psychologically uncomfortable experience.

Although I have knocked the design of fat foreheads and chins on modern smartphones — the latest being Sony’s Xperia XZ Premium — I think I’m changing my mind, a little bit. I don’t like huge foreheads and chins, but I do like and want there to be enough so I can get a good grip without worrying I’ll engage something on the touchscreen I didn’t intend to, or drop it. I don’t think there’s an optimal absolute thickness; the thickness of the forehead and chin will depend on how long, thick, and heavy the smartphone is so it will vary among different smartphones. The goal of the forehead and chin is to engender confidence that we can firmly hold the smartphone and that we won’t accidentally touch-engage something we did not intend to.

Yes, software can reduce unintentional touches to some degree but I’ll bet it can’t completely eliminate them. And because of that the uncomfortable feeling will remain, just less and less intensely. This is the reason why I will probably not jump on the iPhone X bandwagon. I want to be able to firmly grip my smartphone knowing I will not unintentionally touch-engage something and that it won’t slip out of my fingers because there’s little to nothing to grip; I want a psychologically comfortable experience, and I’m willing to deal with a little more forehead and a little more chin than the latest and greatest smartphones with ultra-thin bezels.

OnePlus 5 Focus on Dual-Lens Camera

Dan Seifert:

Even with the advantage of being based in Shenzhen, OnePlus still can’t always get the best components other companies might have. After all, both Apple and Samsung make their own processors, and Samsung is one of the leading manufacturers of display technologies in the world. Those in-house display and chip technologies show up in their phones long before they make it anywhere else. (Or in the case of Apple’s chips, they never show up in other companies’ products at all.)

For the OnePlus 5, that meant the company wasn’t able to utilize the tall, edge-to-edge screens that Samsung and LG have pushed this year. “This is something we want to try,” says Lau. “But we don’t currently have the resources or access to those displays.”

So OnePlus zeroed in its efforts on the part it can get: a better camera. The OnePlus 5 features a dual-camera system, a first for the company.

The “tall, edge-to-edge screens that Samsung and LG have pushed this year” are not merely tall and edge-to-edge; it is not just a different form factor. Those screens are the best screens that have been integrated into smartphones; they are even better than some of the best TV screens. These two companies’ smartphone displays are at the top or very near the top in color gamut, color accuracy, contrast, reflectance, brightness, and a plethora of other display metrics. Samsung has OLED, and LG has IPS LCD; Samsung’s OLED is curved, and LG’s IPS LCD is not. Either way you can’t go wrong with their tall, edge-to-edge screens, but the truth is as Seifert wrote: it will be a while before these beautiful displays get into the hands of other brands. The one exception would be Apple with its next iPhone expected to be announced around September with OLED displays that will likely be supplied by both Samsung and LG.

I expect the OnePLus 5 to have a good implementation of a dual-lens camera, especially the camera’s portrait capabilities. Similar in design and in function to the dual-lens iPhone 7 Plus. But the focus on making a better camera is not good enough. The challenge is to make the display as good as the camera. The display has to be just as good at transforming electrons back into photons as the camera is at transforming photons into electrons. For smartphone photography a great display with a so-so camera is just as useless as a so-so display with a great camera. The two go hand in hand. This camera-and-screen one-two punch is one of the many reasons why the Samsung Galaxy S8, LG G6, and the iPhone 7 Plus are considered to be the best smartphones on the market today. The OnePlus 5 launches tomorrow at noon in New York City.

Source: The Verge

iPhone 8 Design: New Home Button / Touch ID Location

Sonny Dickson tweeted a photo of what looks like a schematic of the new iPhone, which I will refer to as iPhone 8, specifically the largest most premium 5.8-inch iPhone 8, in this article. The supposed iPhone 8 schematic shows a couple of different design elements from iPhone 7s.

NEW DESIGN

There are two cutouts that are of particular interest. One is related to the camera: the two-lens cutout and LED flash are aligned vertically. Not such a big deal in my opinion, but I wonder if there are any advantages of positioning the two lenses vertically when it comes to machine learning-based bokeh generation.

The other cutout that peaks my interest is round, and underneath the Apple logo. That round cutout seems to be located right in the middle, height wise and width wise, of the back of iPhone 8. If the schematic is real, and that’s a big if, and if that cutout is for the home button / Touch ID, Apple is embarking on a wholely new home button / Touch ID user experience significantly different from all previous generations of iPhones.

There’s nothing inherently wrong with doing things differently, as long as the user experience doesn’t suffer too much for too long. And you don’t want to change too many things all at once. Regarding iPhone users many of us are still struggling to get used to not having a 3.5-mm audio jack. We get dongles; we get Bluetooth earphones, but none are as simple as connecting a set of headphones we already have. We all get used to new things but when we are used to doing something a certain way the new can get frustrating because it requires change in our thoughts and actions, both of which can take considerable time and effort. For some of us change comes easy, but for others change can be frustrating.

 

Apple iPhone 7 Plus

Apple iPhone 7 Plus

Our productivity takes a dive in the short term too, but if the new thing is designed better than the old thing productivity should eventually improve to a level unreachable before the new thing. Maybe the new home button location on the back is such a new thing. Maybe not. But ergonomically it makes sense to me: when we hold our smartphones our index fingers whether left or right naturally and automatically nestles into about where the cutout is shown in the schematic.

Or perhaps Apple is separating the home button and Touch ID. Keep the home button in the front and move Touch ID to the back. The home button can be both touch and force sensitive while Touch ID simply reads fingerprints. There are times when I want to press only the home button without activating Touch ID. This need is somewhat mitigated by a new feature that automatically turns on the display when iPhone thinks I want to take a look at the screen; it’s a nice feature borrowed from Apple Watch. Separating Touch ID from the home button could be one explanation for the rear circular cutout. But the only sure thing is that we will have to wait and see.

OLED

Let’s assume Apple is transitioning away from IPS LCDs to OLED displays on its next iPhones. It might seem Apple doesn’t have a lot of experience with integrating OLED displays into devices, but that’s not completely the case. Apple Watch uses an OLED display and so does the 2016 TouchBar-equipped MacBook Pro. Granted they are not smartphone OLED displays. So Apple has some experience, but not as much as say Samsung. Another area where Apple doesn’t have a lot of experience is working with Samsung’s display team in developing new technology and solutions. When it comes to displays Apple has worked mostly with LG Display to push the envelope further. Again, assuming Apple is going OLED in the next iPhone or one of the next iPhones, the question then becomes: Is Apple having difficulties integrating fingerprint sensing and force sensing into/onto the OLED display? Looks like it.

Apple has patents when it comes to this. Back in October of 2016, AppleInsider reported Apple was awarded a patent that allows fingerprint sensing through displays: US Patent No. 9,460,332. The patent if successfully implemented can replace the physical home button with a virtual one. Perhaps Apple is experiencing technical challenges with integrating a virtual Touch ID that also senses force. Earlier in 2016 Apple was also granted US Patent No. 20060007222 for an “integrated sensing display” that “includes display elements integrated with image sensing elements” (source: The Mac Observer via DISPLAYBLOG). But patents are one thing, building real products based on those patents is another.

On April 12th of this year, AppleInsider cited analyst Timothy Arcuri of Cowen and Company stating potential yield issues for  iPhone 8’s “under-glass” fingerprint sensor solution by Apple’s in-house AuthenTec. Note: Melbourne, Florida-based AuthenTec was purchased by Apple in 2012 for US$356 million (source: Reuters). According to Arcuri Apple is unwilling to use a solution provided by a third party.

LG Innotek Under Cover Glass Fingerprint Sensor

LG Innotek Under Cover Glass Fingerprint Sensor

Apple’s AuthenTec isn’t the only company trying to develop fingerprint sensors that can work underneath the screen. LG Innotek announced in May 2016 that it developed a new fingerprint sensor that fits into a 0.01-inch (0.03 mm) space cut into the underside of a smartphone cover glass (source: The Korea Times via The Verge). A circular or rectangular fingerprint sensor button becomes unnecessary allowing for a more seamless design.

Synaptics also introduced its Natural ID FS9100 optical fingerprint sensors late last year. The FS9100 sensors can scan fingerprints through 1mm-thick cover glass. But neither solution is something Apple can use for its iPhone 8’s supposedly all-screen design.

According to The Korea Herald a South Korea-based biometric sensor company CrucialTec announced that it had patented a technology allowing the installation of a fingerprint sensor underneath a smartphone display panel:

Touch screens embedded with fingerprint sensors will allow users to authenticate their identity by simply touching the smartphone display.

This might be the solution Apple is seeking to mass manufacture, but Apple is unwilling to work with third parties for its under-the-screen Touch ID fingerprint reader; it is after all an extremely sensitive area of the iPhone.

NEW IS HARD

It takes guts, an unwillingness to accept failure, tremendous grit, etc. to do things no one has done before, even if it is merely integrating parts that already exist. The original iPhone was born through that process. I’m rooting for all the Apple engineers trying to make this happen. But even if they don’t succeed this time I’m certain a solution will be developed in the future.

As for the 5.8-inch iPhone 8 schematic with what looks like a home button cutout in the back, I don’t think that’s a bad idea at all if that means the OLED screen in the front is really seamless.

 

Google Seeks Strategic Investment & Relationship With LG Display To Secure OLED Smartphone Displays

Google Pixel

According to Korea-based ETNews (Korean), Mountain View, California-based Google has approached LG Display and offered a strategic investment of ₩1 trillion (around US$880 million) toward constructing a single line in a Gen. 6 small/medium flexible OLED fabrication plant. Instead of engaging LG Display toward establishing a long term supply agreement Google is seeking to establish a strategic relationship with one of the world’s largest supplier of displays.

Google is most likely experiencing difficulties acquiring OLED displays for its flagship Pixel smartphone. The world’s dominant supplier of smartphone OLED displays is Samsung, but Samsung will be using its own OLED supply for its newly launched Galaxy S8 and S8+ smartphones. In addition there is speculation that Apple has secured most of the rest of Samsung’s OLED capacity for the next iPhone, which is expected to be named iPhone 8 or iPhone X. With Samsung’s OLED capacity earmarked for the Galaxy S8, S8+ and the next iPhone, Google needed to find another supplier and for the long term. The switch from LCD to OLED is underway and when Apple signals the smartphone world that OLED is the display technology of choice with its next iPhone all major brands will probably transition to OLED as well especially for their high-end smartphone offerings.

LG Display Paju Cluster

LG Display is currently building out two Gen. 6 flexible OLED fabrication plants: E5 in Gumi and Paju-based E6. E5 is expected to start production in Q3’17 while E6 is slated to come online in the second half of 2018. About $1.7 billion will be invested toward constructing the Gen 6 (1500x1850mm) flexible OLED fab; E6 is expected to have a monthly input capacity of 15,000 substrates. LG Display has invested $900 million to build its E5 fab, which is slated for production in 1H’17 with an initial monthly input capacity of 7,500 substrates or about 1.5 million 5.5-inch flexible OLED displays.

If Google and LG Display sign a strategic investment agreement flexible OLED displays earmarked for Google will probably be manufactured at LG Display’s E5 fab. Google’s investment would be coming at an important time for LG Display as the company builds its flexible OLED capacity for smartphones and other small/medium applications.

LG Display has been the main supplier of displays to Apple for many years. Apple’s iPhones, iPads, iMacs, MacBooks, etc. are mostly supplied by LG Display due to the company’s well received and superior IPS LCD technology. But if Apple switches to OLED displays for the company’s iPhones it will be a major blow to LG Display. Samsung has been honing its smartphone OLED display technology for many years and it will likely be an uphill battle for LG Display to catch up. Although Apple might use LG Display as a second or third supplier of flexible OLED displays in the future, the probability that it will be sooner than later seems low. LG Display needs Google as much as Google needs LG Display.

Google is expected to announce a new Pixel smartphone this fall and to secure a reliable supply of flexible OLED displays via a strategic relationship with LG Display makes a lot of sense.

Samsung Galaxy S8 & S8+

Samsung Galaxy S8 S8+ Front

[ Samsung ] The Samsung Galaxy S8 comes in two sizes: the regular version, simply called S8, sports a 5.8-inch OLED display while the larger S8+ is equipped with a slightly larger 6.2-inch screen. The main design difference between the S8 and the S7 is the thickness of the forehead and the lip: those are much thinner on the S8. And by incorporating a longer screen Samsung incorporated a larger display without making it wider. The overall look is quite nice, handsome even.

The iPhone 7 Plus is physically wider and taller but sports a smaller 5.5-inch LCD with a lot less pixels (1920×1080), thanks to the now relatively huge forehead, lip, and bezels on the sides. The Galaxy S8 is similar to the LG G6, which features a longer 18:9 (2:1) aspect ratio 2880×1440 display, both Samsung’s S8 and S8+ have a tiny bit more stretch with a 2960×1440 pixel format and a 2.06:1 aspect ratio. The extra 80 pixels comes in handy as they are used for the Overview (Menu or Open Apps), Home, and Back soft buttons. The remaining 2880 pixels can be used to have two 1440×1440 square windows, while still having access to the soft navigation buttons.

The smaller S8 has a slightly higher 570 ppi resolution while the larger S8+ features a resolution of 529 ppi. These displays have a name, like they always do, and are called: Quad HD+ Super AMOLED. Meaningless, but I guess someone’s getting paid to have fun.

DisplayMate president Raymond Soneira took a battery of display-related tests and found impressive results for the Samsung S8 and S8+.

Color Gamut 100% DCI-P3, thanks to the new high saturation “Deep Red” OLED. The Galaxy S8 can display the latest 4K video content. The measured absolute color accuracy is 2.7 JNCD, which most likely is more accurate than the 4K UHD TV in our living room.

In the AMOLED Photo screen mode the Galaxy S8’s color gamut is 98% Adobe RGB, the color profile many photographers prefer due to the 17% larger color gamut than sRGB/Rec.709.

UHD Alliance Mobile HDR Premium

HDR First smartphone to be UHD Alliance certified for Mobile HDR Premium. This little bit here is a big deal. We watch a lot of view on our smartphones and the format has gone from SD, 720p HD, and 1080p HD. Some enjoy 4K. HDR or High Dynamic Range improves contrast and color making those pixels even more enjoyable to watch. But beware of brands touting HDR without OLED displays or without a LED-backlit LCDs with a bunch of LED zones; that type of HDR combines edge-lit backlights and “intelligent” software, which is not as good, and sometimes terrible, compared to the real hardware version.

Brightness 1000+ nits. This is bright, and will be good when we’re out in the sun and need to check our phones. For comparison the iPhone 7 has a peak brightness of 602 cd/m2 (same thing as nit), test results by Soneira. Brightness can significantly help us see out in the sun, but combine that with low screen reflectance and sunlight viewability becomes greatly improved. The S8’s screen reflectance is 4.5%; the iPhone 7 beats it by a hair with 4.4%. Combine brightness and screen reflectance and it’s a no brainer which smartphone is better out in the sun: the Galaxy S8/S8+.

Night Mode Blue Light Filter reduces the amount of blue light. On an RGB OLED night mode is effective, because the B (blue) OLED sub-pixel’s brightness can be turned down. Night Mode on an LCD is non-sense: all the light coming out of the backlight is generated by a blue LED with a yellow phosphor coating. The combination of the blue light coming out of the LED and the yellow phosphor results in white light. This white light however is not full-spectrum, meaning more saturated colors such as red are not rendered very well.

The reason why brands such as Samsung and Apple are coming out with Night Mode is to reduce the negative effect of blue light on our circadian rhythm, or our sleep cycles. Light, especially light in the blue wavelength region of the spectrum, is the most powerful signal for shifting or resetting our circadian rhythm. Low levels of melatonin is present during the day and those levels go up a few hours before going to sleep and peaks in the middle of the night. Melatonin is a natural hormone found in the body that regulates sleep and wakefulness; in other words melatonin is what synchronizes our mind and body to our sleep cycles. Light suppresses melatonin. When we are watching our LCD or OLED TVs, working on our LCD monitors, watching movies on our tablets and/or smartphones we are letting a bunch of light especially blue light into our eyes that suppresses melatonin. Light in the evening causes a circadian delay and shifts our circadian rhythm to a later schedule. The more we look at our devices in the evening the harder it is for us to fall asleep when we want to. The best thing to do to reset our circadian rhythm to a healthy cycle is to put down our devices in the early evenings, but if that’s not possible having a display with an effective Night Mode is essential to prevent your circadian cycle to be shifted toward later in the evening. Finally and most importantly all of this is to sleep well, which is paramount if you want to feel good and be productive the next day.

Samsung Galaxy S8 Camera System

Camera Most of us have one camera: our smartphones. That’s why having a good camera on our smartphones has become so important. The S8 and S8+ has a fast ƒ/1.7 aperture lens, on both the back and front lenses. The iPhone 7’s lens is fast too, at ƒ/1.8 (the wide-angle lens), but falls a little behind. The faster the lens the more light it brings into the image sensor. In other words, we can take photos in darker settings without resorting to the flash.

The image sensor pixel size is important too. The larger the pixel size the more light it can absorb. The S8 and S8+ has a 1/2.55-inch image sensor, coupled with 12 megapixels, results in the pixel size of 1.4µm. According to Chipworks the iPhone 7 and 7 Plus sport the same 12 megapixels but image sensor pixels are smaller: 1.22µm. We will be able to take photos in darker environments with the S8 than we can with the iPhone 7.

Selfies are huge. And Samsung made sure to update the front camera. The selfie camera sports an 8 megapixel image sensor, an improved face detection algorithm for faster and more accurate autofocus. The aperture is the same as the rear camera at ƒ/1.7, but with a slightly smaller pixel size of 1.22µm. The FOV (field of view) is a wide 80 degrees. Often we are taking selfies with a group of people and that’s when a wider FOV becomes important.

EverythingApplePro took the Galaxy S8 and the iPhone 7 out for some side-by-side comparison testing. The conclusion? The S8 had the upper edge, but it was quite close. Take a look for yourself.

The Samsung Galaxy S8 and S8+ is without a doubt a much more beautiful smartphone than the LG G6 and especially the iPhone 7 Plus. How our smartphone looks is definitely important, but beauty isn’t everything. In terms of overall system speed, that’s a different story: check out EverythingApplePro’s “Samsung Galaxy S8 vs iPhone 7 Plus Speed Test”. iPhone 7 Plus wins, especially when already opened apps are relaunched. The multicore performance GeekBench benchmarks are similar between the two, but the single core performance of the iPhone 7 Plus is a little less than 2x that of the Galaxy S8.