Sony Xperia XZ Premium

Sony Xperia XZ Premium

Sony claims the Xperia XZ Premium is the world’s first smartphone with a 4K HDR display. 4K on a 5.5-inch display is technically impressive, but there might be a large negative impact on battery life. HDR? True HDR requires a display with an LED-backlit BLU (the more LEDs the better), or that it be an OLED display. Does the Xperia XZ Premium have an LED-backlit display? Most likely not; the BLU like almost all other non-OLED smartphones is edge-lit. Is it OLED? No. I might be wrong, but the HDR in this case is probably software based.

The overall industrial design of the Xperia XZ Premium is to my liking: a simple but consistent rectangular shape with diamond cut chamfered edges. The only area that needs a bit of improvement is the forehead and the lip; they are too thick. On the other hand I don’t like it too thin because in order to hold it firmly our fingers need some space. I would have forgiven the thick lip if physical or capacitive back, home, and apps buttons were located there, but no they are on the display taking up valuable pixel space. Oh, there is one more niggle: although the camera bump is not as large as the ones found on recent iPhones it’s still there. A camera-bump-less design is a more beautiful design.

Source: Sony

Sony A1

Sony A1 / A1E OLED TV

The Sony A1 series — the series name for the US versions is A1E — is a 4K Ultra HD (UHD) OLED Smart Android TV with High Dynamic Range (HDR).

Minimal, is the perfect word to describe Sony’s A1: an OLED display panel, protected by a cover glass, encased in a metal frame. Sony’s Acoustic Surface generates sound by vibrating the screen, in lieu of traditional speakers. A stand props up the beautiful display.

Initial reports seem to suggest the Sony A1 is easily the brightest OLED on the market, and indicate LG Display as the OLED panel supplier.

Technical Specifications:

  • Display: 55, 65, 77 UHD OLED
  • HDR: Dolby Vision, HDR10
  • Visual Engine: X1 Extreme
  • OS: Android TV

Android. I think it would have been better to leave out an operating system. The SoC, RAM, storage, etc. will all be in need of upgrading in the next two to three years. I would not want to be forced to upgrade my TV in a couple of years just because the computer parts are getting old. Leave the OS stuff to external boxes; they are cheap and better ones come out frequently.

The OLED TV market is getting some competition and that should make OLED TVs better, more affordable, and soon.

Sources: Trusted Reviews, c|net